"I like the idea that the painter can right what’s wrong in the world, somehow make something beautiful out of something horrible. If it’s really horrible, like factually horrible, something like the Haitian earthquake, and nobody is doing anything to help those people then you can make a real powerful political statement about how they’re not helping. And maybe the beautiful result won’t be the painting but that it influenced some people to go over there and help. If you can paint the anguish of everyday life and give some dignity to everyday despair or anguish or some of the emotions that regular people have, their feelings or thoughts become worthy of an artistic endeavor. There’s something beautiful about recognizing those kind of things in life and saying something about them."

George Condo http://www.huffingtonpost.com/marina-cashdan/the-mental-states-of-geor_b_813466.html

"The greatness of art depends absolutely on the greatness of of the artist’s individuality and on and on the same source depends the power to acquire a technique sufficient for expression. 
The man who is forever acquiring technique with the idea that sometime he may have something to express, will never have the technique of the thing he wishes to express.”
—Robert Henri

"The greatness of art depends absolutely on the greatness of of the artist’s individuality and on and on the same source depends the power to acquire a technique sufficient for expression. 

The man who is forever acquiring technique with the idea that sometime he may have something to express, will never have the technique of the thing he wishes to express.”

—Robert Henri

Sink, oil on canvas, 66 x 58 in., 2014

Sink, oil on canvas, 66 x 58 in., 2014

working on a lot of things at once right now. 

working on a lot of things at once right now. 

Sink, oil on canvas, 49 x 32 in., 2014

Sink, oil on canvas, 49 x 32 in., 2014

Sink, oil on canvas, 78 x 46 in., 2014

Sink, oil on canvas, 78 x 46 in., 2014

four bathers burlap, 9 x 12 in., ea., respectively.

THE STATUS OF PORTRAITURE - AUTONOMIE PROJECTS

I am fortunate enough to be included in a show at the nonprofit art space, Autonomie Projects, opening this Saturday in Los Angeles from 5-8:30pm.

Press Release:

THE STATUS OF PORTRAITURE

While portraiture has long been seen as a sign of cultural ‘status’ and class distinction this survey of Los Angeles portraiture examines the varied approaches being taken up by today’s painters with regard to rendering a likeness, not only of a seated subject, but of the subject of portraiture itself. These disparate approaches to re-imagining portrait painting not only include formal innovations but they also question many of the traditional assumptions of the genre. By challenging historical conventions such as naturalism, stability and easy identification of the subject, all of the painters in The Status of Portraiture challenge us to think differently about what constitutes a portrait in the 21st century. Conflating interior and exterior states with different personal and theoretical concerns the painters in The Status of Portraiture give us a new series of motifs for thinking about access to the image of another, and in so doing, perhaps even another route into thinking about ourselves. 

ARTISTS

Justin Bower, Virginia Broersma, Josh Dildine, Alec Egan, Jay Erker, Andrew Foster, Roni Feldman, Steve Hampton, Laurance McNamara, Max Presneill, Constance Mallinson, Jason Ramos, Erica Ryan Stallones and Frank J. Stockton. 

Sink, oil on canvas, 39 x 46 in., 2013

Sink, oil on canvas, 39 x 46 in., 2013